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Top 10 Mistakes People Make When Ordering Explainer Videos

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top ten mistakes make explainer video order

Explainer videos have recently been on the rise, and for good reason. They are excellent tools for boosting the number of sales and conversions for a product. However, many explainer videos fail to do their job. When that happens, the fault does not usually lie with the product or even with the video. It’s because of a poor script. Contrary to what you might believe, the script is the most important component of the explainer video. The action and animation are important too, but they should be thought of primarily as a supplement to the script. Here are ten common mistakes businesses make when ordering explainer videos.

 

1. Not knowing what you want

You should start your search for an animation company by coming up with some idea of how you want your video to look. Ask yourself whether you want motion graphics, 2D animation, 3D animation or some other style of animation. Look at your competitors’ videos to see what is most effective. If you end up with the wrong sort of animation, your product will end up looking silly.

 

2. Not knowing the purpose of your video

Are you looking for a video to play at trade shows? Or will you put it on your website? Perhaps you’re hoping to distribute it through social media. You have to know what audience you’re trying to cater to. That will determine the kind of script you need to write. Know the purpose of your video beforehand and think about that audience’s needs.

 

3. Hiring the wrong animation company

You should hire an animation company with a solid portfolio. Looking over the portfolio, try to determine whether their style could naturally represent your product. If the animation doesn’t match your product, not only does the resulting explainer video fail to boost your product’s image, but it could potentially damage it by misrepresenting it.

 

4. Writing a disorganized script

Even when requesting a script-writing service from a video company, you have to be prepared. Nobody knows or cares about your product as much as you do. Take the time to brainstorm and write down all the reasons why someone should purchase your product. Review this list and narrow it down to the most essential points. Submitting an outline that is clear and concise will help the video company to know more exactly what you want.

 

5. Making the script too formal

The term “explainer video” might not be the best one. After all, the purpose of your video is not to explain but to convince. You want to capture your audience’s attention. Only then can you begin to describe your product. If your script sounds technical or professional, your audience will not pay attention.

 

6. Restricting your creative team

Don’t be afraid to seek help. Find people who have the skills to perform the tasks necessary to creating a quality video. Even if you want creative control over the video, you’ll benefit from the perspectives of others. If you want to have a solid script, work with a professional writer. If you want a convincing voice-over, then find someone with a smooth and natural delivery.

 

7. Being too vague

Your video should make it very clear what your product is and does. Anticipate what questions your audience would ask about your product. Make sure that their questions and concerns are addressed in your video.

 

8. Adding too many words

You might have a lot to say, but the time you have to say it is restricted to a few minutes. You want your voice-over to be move along at a steady but clear pace. The ideal speed for your voice-over is approximately 150 words per minute. This will allow your audience to comprehend your script, and the voice-over delivery will sound natural and organic to your video.

 

9. Sacrificing quality for your deadline

Let’s say that you have a trade show coming up, and the video is still incomplete. Should you ask the video company to just wrap it up or give you what they have? The answer is absolutely not. A video of mediocre quality is worse than no video at all. Remind yourself that you only have one chance to win over your audience with a video. If the video seems subpar or unfinished, it will reflect negatively on your product. Get it completely right the first time or not at all.

 

10. Forgetting a “Call to Action”

Your audience isn’t going to do anything on its own. Your video cannot be passive. It needs to aggressively persuade the audience to follow up after watching the video.